Raising Healthy Families with Moms Meet and KIWI

Why Moms Are So Crucial in the Fight Against Climate Change

September 07, 2021 Moms Meet and KIWI magazine Season 1 Episode 4
Raising Healthy Families with Moms Meet and KIWI
Why Moms Are So Crucial in the Fight Against Climate Change
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

The climate crisis is top of mind for many as wildfires, floods, droughts, and insane weather threaten the globe. But it's not all doom and gloom! Hear from Dr. Joellen Russell of Science Moms, a highly-accredited climate scientist and mom, about why moms are so important in this battle and how we can fight climate change. We are not powerless in the face of this global crisis and have the time and ability to stop the worst from happening.

Chrissy:

Welcome to raising healthy families with moms meeting Kiwi. We're giving you the tools to enjoy the beauty and chaos of life with little ones in the healthiest way possible.

Maureen:

Hi, everyone. I'm Maureen frost editorial director of Kiwi magazine. We are so thrilled to have Dr. Joellen Russell with us today to talk more about the climate crisis and what we as moms can do to fight climate change. Our kids should be able to grow up on a healthy planet full of beauty and wonder. The climate crisis is a looming threat to our kids and our kids kids. And as moms and parents, it's our job to protect them. Luckily, we are not powerless in the face of this global crisis and have the time and ability to stop the worst from happening. Today we're chatting with Dr. Joellen Russell of Science, Moms, a highly accredited climate scientist and mom about why moms are so important in this battle and how we can fight climate change. It's time for us to stand up and protect the home of our families for generations to come. sighs moms is a nonpartisan group of climate scientists and mothers It was founded to help mothers who are concerned about their children's planet but aren't confident in their knowledge about climate change or how they can help. Science Moms aims to demystify climate science and motivate everyday mas to demand solutions that preserve the planet for our kids. As scientists they have collectively spent decades studying our earth and what human activity is doing to it. They are steeped in this reality every day and know that to solve this problem, it will take all of us moms joining forces. Together we can give our children the healthy and prosperous future they deserve. Dr. Russell is the Thomas R. Brown distinguished Chair of integrative science professor at the University of Arizona in the department of geosciences, a founder of Science Moms and a mom of two. All right, thank you so much for joining us today. Dr. Russell, I am thrilled to be here. Yay. We are we are thrilled as well, we're so excited to have you talking on this extremely important topic right now. I personally am so passionate about sustainability. and educating our audience through Moms Meet and Kiwi on climate change, whether it be the causes, and also the solutions that we should be paying attention to, to to fix climate change. Climate change is such a universal issue. And we all really need to pay immediate attention to it. And so it's so great that we were doing that right now. And we can talk more about it. So Dr. Russell, I just want to get into our questions with you. I'm so many to ask you. I it's amazing to speak to someone who has such an expertise and a background in this area that I'm so interested in. And we all should be. Can you tell us a little bit more about what you do, and how you got involved in climate science.

Dr. Joellen Russell:

So I use a robot floats, supercomputers and satellites to try and see the future. Now really, I'm I'm an oceanographer, and we use robot floats, satellites and other kinds of observations and great big huge climate models to try and predict what might happen next on planet Earth. So with all these increasing carbon pollution blanket, and I started out as a kid growing up in a fishing village on the Arctic Ocean, the check TC, and always just wanted to know where the sea ice went, you know, it breakup time, it's all all ice in and then the sea ice would go out. And I just I want to know where it went. It was too dangerous to follow it in a boat. And back in the day there. You know, we didn't have a whole lot of even satellite measurements of where was it going or models of how the ocean worked or measurements. And now I know where the sea ice goes. And so I've known I wanted to be an oceanographer since I was just a kid, and seeing the big changes that were happening in our ice in our ocean in our temperatures on land. And now I worried because I'm a mom, you know, here it where I live in Arizona and Tucson. We have to get up early this time of year because otherwise it gets too hot to walk the dogs, they'll burn their little feet on the on the pavement if I have to worry about heatstroke with my kids. If I turn my turn my kids out to ride their bikes last summer may have came back in and she said Mama Mama My head hurts and I feel dizzy. She had a little bit of heatstroke. It's really serious. This is affecting our kids. It's and so that's why in addition to being a professor and doing research and oceanography, etc I also am a co founder of this group called science Moms you can check us out at science moms calm, because we're trying to get make climate science more that issue of climate more accessible to moms. Because we think this is our Rosie the Riveter moment, right? For our generation, where we moms need to roll up our sleeves and help make action on climate. It's threatening our kids, it's threatening our kids futures, at our potential prosperity. And we need to there are specific things we can do as moms, to protect our kids, and we need to do it.

Maureen:

I totally agree. You know, as moms, we do the hard things all day, every day. And this is the most one of the most important things that we can do as moms, for our kids and future generations, their kids. And we can do it because we can do anything and we do everything every day is so here we are.

Dr. Joellen Russell:

It's been so tough during pthe andemic, you know, we're juggling, you know, not that we're not always juggling, but it was even harder, you know, with less help, you know, with childcare and schools and worrying about them and trying to get them to keep their little masks on and everything I know, really hard. But at the same time, I'm looking at the sky with all the wildfire smoke, and these epic wildfires, and we've had heatwave after heat wave. And that means that so we got to do these specific right now things and then we have to do the specific right now things for kids future. And so you know, we're seeing the effects of climate change. This new IPCC report that's just come out is telling us that very serious changes already occurred, but that my family loves to I've been going to Glacier National Park with my my parents, and now I take my kids, but it's going to be National Park, not Glacier National Park. Pretty soon now the glaciers have shrunk, many of them have disappeared, because this is what this is what's happening. heat and drought and flooding is an effect of this carbon pollution blanket that we're basically adding to every time we burn our fossil fuels. So everything we can do to reduce our impact on the amount of carbon pollution we're putting in the atmosphere and, and tell our legislators, our representatives to get it in gear and get moving. What can we collectively do? What can we individually do to stop contributing to the problems that are being caused by this carbon pollution? Blake? It's, it's time to take action.

Maureen:

Absolutely. So I'm glad you brought that up. Because the most recent climate report came out last week. And you know, it's hard not to feel hopeless when you see the scary facts and and data that are in this report. I know that I mean, it's hard not this year to not have an impending feeling of doom no matter what. But it's, it's just around us.

Dr. Joellen Russell:

Yeah so the report was so good. what they said was, yes, we are definitely seeing these impacts already. And you know, sea level rising, you know, wildfires, droughts, heat waves, all of these things, we're seeing them. However, when they look into the future, they say, Here's if we burn it all, if we keep adding that carbon pollution blanket, oh my goodness, there's a really bad thing they're gonna happen. And then they see but if we reduce it by a little by little more by a whole lot, we can reduce those impacts. So in fact, that's why I like to channel my inner Rosie the Riveter, with our science bombs, etc, is that it every little bit of carbon that you don't we don't our kids don't put into the atmosphere is? Well, two things. One, we don't, it won't contribute to the warming, but second, it usually saves us money, because we're paying for all those fossil fuels, right? Whether it's gas in your car, or you know, heating or cooling your house, you know, more insulation in the roof will help with that, you know, there are so many things, we can do little things big things, to to keep that pollution out of the atmosphere. And that's, we need to do that individually. We also need to get our representatives on. And that means not just at the federal level, but at the state level because the our electric grids, our energy grids are usually set at the state level. So you know, you don't just need to write to your mayor or show up at your town council meeting. You need to write to your governor and your state legislature and as well as your federal representatives because there's so much we could do so much needs doing. And so no Doom here. No, don't. They the IPCC report showed you a range of our futures. I read a little meme on Twitter that said this is the worst Choose Your Own Adventure book I've ever seen. Every single one of these is bad, but some of them are slightly better. Right? really true, they are better. Every time we choose not to add to that pollution blanket, we are choosing a better, more prosperous future for our kids.

Maureen:

So one is being done right now. Like on a more governmental level to stave off such devastation, that could be the worst case scenario?

Dr. Joellen Russell:

Well, it is actually the Supreme Court actually ruled the 2007. I know this sounds wonky, but the Supreme Court ruled Massachusetts and a bunch of other states sued, the Supreme Court sued the EPA, the Environmental Protection Agency for not regulating carbon dioxide is a pollutant under the Clean Air Act. And the Supreme Court ruled that yes, it is covered under under the Clean Air Act, the Clean Air Act says if it's a pollutant, it's causing harm, you have to regulate it. And so there are you know, there is a federal law that covers this. Now, we're not really using it super efficiently yet, but so there are these combinations of things, you know, they need to implement regulations, they need to tighten them up, we need to build better technology, cars, etc, that take advantage of a better, more electrified grid. And all of those are things that, you know, there are many, many people working on. But right now, what is missing is sort of the political will to implement this. And I'm not talking about like, which solution to choose, I kind of want to choose all of them. But, but in fact, telling our representatives that this matters, unfortunately, a lot of times that keeps getting bumped down the list. And it's, it's a little bit like, you know, never remembering to save money, you know, if you don't put anything in the in your savings account, you won't have any, right. And so we're basically not where we keep putting more and more into this pollution blanket. And there are a lot of things, we could be doing a lot of things and I'm not even advocating one individual thing, I'm just saying different states are going to find different solutions, you know, different, different small, you know, different towns are going to find better ways to reduce their use of fossil fuels. Because really, all we need to do is that's what that IPCC report said, the more the less we put into the pollution blanket, the better the outcomes, the smaller the changes in climate, and the less threat there is to our kids. So everything we can do, and there is real progress being made, the United States has dropped almost 20% of their carbon emissions, that our peak missions were back in 2007, the same time as that Supreme Court ruling. That was our peak year, and we've been coming down since then, really seriously, we've made enormous progress. Now. It's not enough, right that I present it, we're still putting it out, right? But we've made real progress, we could make more, we could tell our representatives we want to go faster. And that the and then do things in our own lives to help teach our kids our values. You know, like, you know, when you are more efficient car, my kids, I want three rows of seats. I know I'm desperate to buy a new car with three rows of seats.

Maureen:

I want that too.

Dr. Joellen Russell:

And my kids are just fighting me on this thing. Like Oh, Mom, we need to go electric. You know, you can't work on climate change and keep and want to buy a gas guzzler. I'm like now, but I want to be able to take everybody to church on the weekend, including the grandparents, they're like, Mom, you can't do this. And so we've been two years I've been wanting to do this, but my kids are just like laying down on the road because and so that is a values discussion. It's something that every family is going to have to take on I hope and think about, but there's also simpler things like new to you. Buying vintage basically means that you are extending the life of something that beyond the landfill, right you are you know secondhand use new to you and you know, as moms we're so good at this right here. This is important because it means that we're the less we buy new, the less we're actually adding to the pile of stuff, right that has to be made much of what and shipped and moved around which is so this is a great way to reduce and save $1 as we know, reduce, you know, insulation, your home, your car, your your food, etc. There are many, many ways that you can keep reducing the amount of carbon pollution an individual or a family puts in. And of course your kids. I mean, my kids do their science fair projects on this sort of stuff, right? This is this is part of it's part of the conversation we've been having since they were little sort of an ongoing, you know, if you if you took it out, you put it away if you write so if we have this carbon pollution problem. We want to not contribute to that, right? So we're we're working on it as a family, but we want to, we want to work on it as a state and as a nation. So that's why science moms calm we're trying to get the word out, trying to get moms to help, help help teach our kids. And listen what our kids try to teach us. No

Maureen:

It's true. And it's their future, too. And they are guessing. more enlightened. And they're, it's more of a conversation now. You know.

Dr. Joellen Russell:

They get it in school. I didn't learn any of

Maureen:

Oh, no. Oh, no. Yeah, you know, you learn recycle, and this in school, did you? I live at the beach. So we learn about, you know, not polluting the ocean and things like that. But not until I probably even, I don't know, college maybe didn't start putting this together. And so.

Dr. Joellen Russell:

Well, I'm using robot fluids in my own research that have pH sensors on them to watch how carbon is being taken up by the ocean, right and out, roughly one in four molecules that comes out of anybody's tailpipe anywhere in the world ends up in the ocean. And one out of eight, you know about half of that goes in around Antarctica goes in in the Southern Ocean. So we've actually been deploying robot flows to detect this, this increase with micro sensors and really great batteries that beams that state are backed by Iridium satellite. By the way, we haven't adopted flow program, if any classroom or kid wants to a science fair project, we have hundreds of these floats out, monitoring the oceans uptake of carbon, carbon accounting, knowing who's doing what to the atmosphere. I mean, we always imagine that tragedy, the commons, where everybody's putting their sheep out to graze. And if nobody, if everybody just keeps putting them out, they will just eat everything and ruin the comments, right. And that's sort of what's happening now is everybody's just dumping into the atmosphere, making it worse for everybody. But we'd like to know who's put those sheep out in the comments who put all that carbon in the atmosphere, which country where and doing that careful accounting, and one of the places that was a weakness in our accounting was in the ocean, because it's 72% of your surface and one out of four carbon molecules. But we got this, we are now measuring this and very carefully watching it evolve. Because it turns out when the ocean absorbs carbon, it does it by forming carbonic acid. So we're basically titrating the ocean and causing ocean acidification, the more carbon we emit. And so all of the little creatures that in the ocean that make their shells or body parts out of calcium carbonate, which is the same material and Tom's you know, which is an acid, you know, you have too much acid, so we know what happens here, right? They're, they're under threat to dissolve, basically, because they because of this acidification from our from our action, so yes, we're getting hotter. Yes, the glaciers are melting. Yes, you can see this from space. Yes, it's getting hotter. Yes, our oceans are warming. Yes, you know, places like Arizona are getting much drought here. And other places are getting much fluffier, because the atmosphere is so much warmer, it can carry so much more water. Now that it's warmer. These are these were predicted effects from back in the 1970s. And now we're kind of living the Climate Reality that everybody told us about 50 years ago. But now it's time to act, we really have to hustle to cut these emissions as soon as we can. Because every bit that we don't put in the atmosphere, gives our kids more options, more opportunity. Whereas if we put it all in there, you know, I just couldn't bear it. If my I don't I just have little kids. I don't have kids yet. But if my grandbaby my future grandbaby tugs on my sleeve and says Mama, Mama, Grandma, why, why didn't you do something? When it would have made a difference? Ah, right. I can't stand it.

Maureen:

No, I agree. That keeps me up at night. So here we are, we're doing something. We're gonna do it right, then what can moms do and why? And why are moms important in this fight? And, and especially like, a lot of times, US moms, we're we're in survival mode, and we're in the nitty gritty and it's hard to stop, take a breath and think about the bigger picture but but we must and and how can we do that though? How can you help us get to that path?

Dr. Joellen Russell:

Moms are you know, I depend on that mom village to help me raise my kids, right because I get to do this great fun science and Professor job because I get a lot of help, you know, with carpool and swim. I do. And I'm so grateful. So this is my little bit that I can give back to science moms calm As to say here, we're gonna make it really simple and give you links to all the great science and basic stuff, little snippy videos really cool explanations, because we think moms, they imagine their kids future, right. They imagine those grandbabies that one day they'll have they imagine the lives that their kids might lead. I think they know how to imagine what's coming, right? The same way the scientists have in the IPCC report said, Hey, here are the calculated outcomes from these climate models and what might happen under these different amounts of carbon pollution and that carbon pollution blanket. So we're doing the same job, you know, climate scientists and moms, we're imagining a future, right, and we're imagining what the consequences of choices are, right? Whether we managed to put a little bit away for kids college, and we imagine what it would be like if we didn't have any, right. We know these things. We there's you can't always do everything. It's totally true. We know that too. Right? The budgets matter. Yeah, practical matters, time matters. But there is so much we can do that is aligned right sustainability and prosperity can align, we can save a buck and save the planet at the same time, while providing for our kids futures and helping transmit our values. Right? I'm talking conservative with a little sea right being careful with their toys, being careful with our missions. These aren't really different. They're the same. It's it's that care for creation that care for our fellow kid, fellow human right. We're an end for our babies, and we want that better future. And there when somebody asked me what can we do? I'm like, everything. There are so many things mean we need our politicians to get off their butts? We do. They're not making it a big enough priority.

Maureen:

So what can we do as moms to get them to take action?

Dr. Joellen Russell:

Well, easy thing is if you go to science moms dot com, we actually have a help you for that little fill out form that you can help you find your representatives.

Maureen:

Yes.

Dr. Joellen Russell:

We have draft emails and things.

Maureen:

It's perfect, moms are busy, put your name in. I actually did this today.

Dr. Joellen Russell:

Yeah, it's so much easier to have little help. I know.

Maureen:

I sent it to my reps in New Jersey as you know.

Dr. Joellen Russell:

And you know what, we need to keep bugging to keep bugging them until we see the action we need. And then second, there's stuff you can do at home, right? Almost all of which saves you money, right? Whether it's buying vintage, or new to you or doing reduce, you know, carpooling all the things we do to save time and money, they're all good for us, right? switching to hybrid or even electric vehicles, when you do have an opportunity to buy another car. And remember us again, is always not that doesn't count on your carbon footprint for your, for the goods and goods in your home. And then insulation, you know, there's so many things we can do. But we do need that collective action. So we have tried to make it super easy on the science mom calm because we are moms, and we have jobs just like you know, and we have kids and we know how busy everybody is. And we also know you'll feel better once you start. Like, once you're on this path of certainly reducing that carbon pollution blanket. It's you you feel like you understand that we get to change the future our kids will live under that we're already doing it we're well past peak conditions were on the drop, right, we are pushing it down, and that every little bit we can do will help our kids and and and all of us, you know better, more prosperous future. So everything at the answer is everything. But also, there are some short snippy things you can do ways to get informed on the website. If you want to come in and see us.

Maureen:

Sometimes I hear and I don't agree with this. But sometimes I hear people say, Well, you know, little things that I do at home, that's not going to make a big difference. It's the big corporations that need to make the change. So like me bringing a reusable bag to the grocery store. What's that going to do? What would you say to somebody that has that mindset right now.

Dr. Joellen Russell:

Um, it's true that not not bringing your reusable bag not insulating your house. One if it saves landfill, it saves pollution. It saves carbon. Every time you do it. Every little bit. Every carbon molecule spends almost 1000 years in the atmosphere. When we emit it right. There's no good way to remove it except waiting for the natural things like the ocean or land plants to take it up. So every little bit counts. It counts Not today, but tomorrow and 10 years and 100 years and your great great great great great great great grandbabies need us to make change. And remember to that one mom, maybe not 10 moms, okay, there's something 100 moms. I mean, I always think about World War Two. I know because my great aunt Mary Ellen was the first woman engineer at Boeing and she built planes through war. And after, and I'm a scientist partly because she was right an engineer. And I think about the you know, Hitler made a really big booboo, he assumed that there wouldn't be enough labor that if he had enough, enough of an edge on us and planes and, and boats and, and ammunition, but basically we if we could, if we sent all our guys swore we wouldn't be able to make enough to catch him, right? Mm hmm. That's where Rosie the Riveter matters, we rolled up our sleeves, our grandmother's dead, they rolled up their sleeves and they went to the factories, they looked after each other's kids, and they built planes, after planes after planes after planes. And they did this and they caught him right? You know, we threw him out of this is a huge challenge, too. And everybody says, Well, I don't know if we should get into that war, etc. Maybe we could, you know, maybe we could make nice with this guy, Hitler. Well, the physics is even more unforgiving, right? This is just the physics. It's just the way carbon works once it's in our atmosphere. So the problem is that if every day we don't decide to fight is a day that isn't making progress, right? And I feel like moms we we've turned this tide before our grandmother's dead, our aunties, etc. We can turn this tide to we don't have to give in to, you know, Doom saying we don't have to get into get into Oh, well, it's not it's somebody else's fault. And we can't make everybody do it. And, you know, all of these are things that are saying, well, let's just let it burn. I refuse to give up hope or negotiate with that jerk. I won't. And I don't think any mom would, because they know, you know, it's not just the IPCC, everybody's using their eyes, they see the floods, they see the heat waves, they see how much longer the summer season is, you know, here in Tucson. Last year, our average number of 100 degree days was 62, which is a lot but isn't too crazy, because, but last year, we broke our record, our previous record was 98 days, which is just, that's a long time to have a hard time putting your kids out to see the sky 108 days last summer, my mother's lilacs in northern Montana. My mother's lilacs are blooming 23 days earlier than they were when she moved into her house. Yeah, this is it's already happened. It's kind of ongoing. The the observations are there. And when you hear all these people in Yum, yum, yeah, say, Oh, you know, it's China's fault, or we shouldn't do anything or what will little me be able to do? And I think about all those grandmas and Rose the river, I think, everything we can do it. Yeah, we can do this. And if we build technology that saves us fossil fuels, which we can then sell to the rest of the world to help them save themselves. Well, then Win win here. Right? Right and win win for the planet. So I everything, let's, let's let's beat this, let's lead. Let's not drag our feet. You know, let's see what we could do to make our kids futures. You know, happier, more prosperous, I don't want them to live in a world with no glaciers. I worry that there is. I mean, I've never been to see the Great Barrier Reef, but I have friends who have and I would hate it if that reef weren't, didn't exist had died. And my kids, you don't want to eight wonders of the world and my kids wouldn't ever be able to even dream about seeing it because it had been gone. I just, I want my kids to have the amazing, wonderful childhood that that my parents gave me that my great aunt and all of our grandparents helped fight for. I don't want to see it go because we, we we didn't have the you know, courage to tackle something big.

Maureen:

And we can do it. And if we all do our part, then we're making an impact. And I think that's what's the most important thing is like, if we're doing it, let's do it together. Let's get each other to do it together.

Dr. Joellen Russell:

Yeah let's do it together. It's waiting. It only makes the problem bigger. Every minute. We are letting it's getting you know, every day every day. So and we're 20% off our peak missions. We know we grew the economy. like gangbusters, while decarbonizing Bob reducing our emissions. So the fact is we can we can both provide for our kids transmit our values and and save, you know, and save the planet all once. You know, this isn't. These aren't separate things, there's no reason for there to be an opposition here.

Maureen:

Absolutely. And we can't not because there's just no other option we have to do it.

Dr. Joellen Russell:

That's right. We're kind of like, it's like the kids go, Well, I don't want to I'm like, well, honey, that's trash isn't gonna take itself out.

Maureen:

So I mean, so we know the small things, which is basically every sustainable thing that we've been taught. And we there's, there's plenty out there to continue to learn and to add one by one into your family. And you don't have to feel overwhelmed. I don't think if you just start small.

Dr. Joellen Russell:

That's right, every little bit. It's so funny that everybody's like, Well, you know, Why would my little bit matter? I'm like, well, that carbon molecule you didn't put it in the atmosphere isn't gonna be there for 1000 years. Yay.

Maureen:

You put it that way. See, it's so great to hear from your scientific perspective, because for lay people who don't necessarily like it, it puts everything into perspective for us, like, I'm learning so much, just because that's not where my expertise is. And so now, I know that what you just said, and I'm going to think of that every time that you know, I could do something more sustainably.

Dr. Joellen Russell:

That's right. It matters. It matters. Also, we're giving a good example to our kids, you know, and they enter the other moms. And, you know, I used to drag my feet, I was not the first adopter, like understanding that BPA free bottles were more important. And my friend said was wanting just to swear she's like, you're not doing that anymore. They're bad. Don't do that. I was like, Okay, fine. Do you better mean sometimes it just took a little twisting my arm to get me to, to move, but she explained it to me. And she showed me the you know, the the website at the, you know, and I Okay, all right, you're right, let's do this. So I every little bit counts, every little bit counts. And it's, it's okay to ask your kids to help to, they are really, really good at this. Other ones are way further ahead on sustainability issues than we were when we were their age. And so it's great to incorporate into science fair projects, it's great to incorporate it into other communities like in Atlanta, they have this carbon reduction challenge that they put on, you know, and what I love is when my kids both a good idea to save parven it always always saves me money. I'm always like, yes, yes.

Maureen:

Win win. So how can I get my mom friends on board in this area? I you know, sometimes you just everyone's thinking about different things and whether or not you know, how do I get them to feel the urgency and the passion.

Dr. Joellen Russell:

Well, you can come see us science moms right there, that's I know that I'm not selling anything we I I'm a volunteer, right? This is normally just us moms trying to try to help each other out the way moms do. And so one you can come and we'll help you write a letter, you know, and you have to write them regularly. Don't just do one, come back in a month and do it again. But two, it's like informational stuff that will help you connect to NASA or know or the Great Dane, if you're really interested or your kids are interested, also. And things you can do, which is also important. So you like specifics. But all of this is in aid of Plus, if you want to you can come see us on Facebook, you can get alerts on things we're doing or the science moms like we do a lot of kind of outreach and talks and things like that. And we do even do some like Facebook Live, you know, if you really have a burning question you can ask us personally, and we'll tell you what this is, um, there's, there's a group of us now I think there's nine of us who are volunteering to try and get the word out expertise and everything from wildfire smoke to you know, ocean acidification and meteorology, you name it. And so we're, we're come on in and see us and we'll we'll you know we can help you find other resources too. But but we're just trying to we're trying to connect to our mom village right then mama village is raising all our kids here. It's it's important that we start thinking and working on this carbon pollution problem. So every little bit counts. You know, refer your friends comes check us out. If it cost nothing. This know, we have nothing to sell. We're not trying. We're totally not a partisan. I don't see this as a left or a right thing. I'm from the great state of Arizona. You know, we're we're a big red. I don't know, purple state. We This is just important. It's a grassroots sort of bottom up approach to making change for our kids. Health and Safety and prosperity.

Maureen:

Yeah, absolutely. I feel inspired. And I feel less Doom less Doomsday over here.

Dr. Joellen Russell:

Oh, it's 20% percent down. We're, those are all just regular folks individually, making wise decisions and companies to mean, we do need to move our companies and our states and our chorus. So but 20% and nobody even noticed. Yeah, most people don't know that our peak emissions were back in 2007. We're on our way down. We just want to go faster. Mm hmm.

Maureen:

Okay, well, well, you hear that everyone, we can do that together, starting with moms. And then you know, obviously, working towards getting our representatives to take this matter on more seriously and put it to the forefront of their agendas. Yeah. So from the small things we can do at home to the big things we can do. pushing our state representatives to to make the changes, you know. Yeah, I think what we've learned today is that we moms are the ones that take on this charge and we can do it.

Dr. Joellen Russell:

Mom muscle. We got it. You just got to roll up our sleeves. I mean, it This isn't unprecedented, right? mothers get drunk driving. Moms can do this. We can be the change that we want to see in the world and help our kids see it too.

Maureen:

Yeah, absolutely. Today's episode is brought to you in part by happy family organics. Happy Family organics has been on a mission to change the trajectory of children's health through nutrition since the company launched on Mother's Day in 2006. They thoughtfully craft organic meals and snacks with curated ingredients that are appropriate for each baby toddler and kids age and stage to help support a lifetime of wellness. as champions of organic every product in their line is certified USDA Organic, which means their food is grown without using toxic persistent pesticides, and has no artificial hormones or GMOs.

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Maureen:

Well, thank you so much for joining us. This has been such a great conversation on the most important topic. So I really appreciate you sharing your expertise with us. I feel inspired. I hope that everyone listening does I know that there's definitely actionable things that people can take away from this conversation which is most important thing is to take action today. Now for all of us and for everyone listening, go to science moms comm To learn more, share with your family and friends. Get those letters that you can easily send to your representatives. And just you know, make this make this a priority for your family. So

Dr. Joellen Russell:

Yay. Thank you!

Maureen:

Yay. Thank you for joining us. So I really appreciate it. This has been amazing to have you on and have this this really important conversation. So thank you everyone for listening and make sure that you hit the like and subscribe button to make sure you don't miss the latest podcast episodes. And next week we are talking with Dr. Yami about the best ways to approach feeding kids plant based foods and building healthy lunches and snacks. Thank you everyone for conquering healthy living at all ages and stages of life with us and thank you so much Dr. Russell for joining us today.

Climate Crisis Discussion