Raising Healthy Families with Moms Meet and KIWI

An Esthetician's Guide to Dry Skin and Eczema Relief

October 13, 2021 Moms Meet and KIWI magazine Season 1 Episode 7
Raising Healthy Families with Moms Meet and KIWI
An Esthetician's Guide to Dry Skin and Eczema Relief
Show Notes Transcript

The dry fall and winter air can do a number on our skin. Between cracked skin, rashes and eczema flare-ups, knowing the best ways to alleviate skin problems can offer your family some much needed relief. Discover the best ways to support your skin from licensed esthetician Brittany Johnson at Gladskin. She shares more about how to handle eczema flare-ups, ways to prevent dry fall skin, and the best way to care for your kid’s skin at any age.

Chrissy:

Welcome to raising healthy families with Moms Meet and KIWI. We're giving you the tools to enjoy the beauty and chaos of life with little ones in the healthiest way possible. Hi everyone, I'm Chirssy Kissinger, the host of Raising Happy Families. Fall and winter air can really do a number on our skin. From dry cracked skin to eczema flare ups. Knowing the best ways to manage it can offer your family some much needed relief. Today we're talking to licensed esthetician Brittany Johnson from Gladskin about how to handle eczema flare ups, dry fall skin and the best way to care for your kids skin and more. Today's podcast is brought to you by Gladskin. Is there a kid or baby with eczema in your family? Gladskin can help you outsmart eczema. Gladskin's endolysin technology works at the skin microbiome level to give your child healthy skin relieving the edge of eczema at the source. Gladskin eczema cream is free of steroids, pediatrician recommended, safe for children as young as three months, and you don't need a prescription. Try it risk free today. Go to gladskin.com/Kiwi for 10% off and free shipping. Again that's gladskin.com/Kiwi for 10% off and free shipping. We're so thrilled to have Brittany Johnson here with us today. Brittany is a licensed esthetician, Gladskin CX team member, dog mom and lover of all things skincare. So thank you so much for joining us today.

Brittany Johnson:

Thank you so much for having me. I talk to parents about Gladskin daily, so I'm really excited to chat with you today.

Chrissy:

Yeah, we're excited to pick your brain for sure. Well, and I'm personally excited to talk to you because you know about eczema and skincare. So I actually get really bad eczema on my hands in the winter time. And it's been such a struggle to keep that in check every single season. And with the cold and dry winter months coming up in October being Eczema Awareness Month. It's a perfect time to chat with you about this. So I just want to jump right in and ask some questions.

Brittany Johnson:

Awesome. Sounds great.

Chrissy:

All right. So let's start off with some of the basics about eczema. So can you tell us more about what eczema looks like and what is considered eczema? I'm sure a lot of people think that just dry, cracked skin could be eczema, but what's the difference?

Brittany Johnson:

Yeah, so I can was characterized by like a red, itchy rash, and it tends to occur in like the creases of the body like the elbows behind the knees, things like that. But it can occur anywhere. There's also seven different types of eczema. Our cream and our products are designed specifically for a topic dermatitis, which is the most common form of eczema, but there's also contact dermatitis neuro dermatitis, seborrhea, dermatitis, psoriasis, dermatitis, dyshidrotic, eczema and Mueller, eczema. Um, so yeah, I don't know, I feel like a lot of people don't know that about eczema, but the kind that most people are referring to is atopic dermatitis.

Chrissy:

Okay. And yeah, that's that's definitely a lot of different types. I didn't even know that many times. So it's interesting to know. So can you tell us a little bit more about the skin microbiome?

Brittany Johnson:

Yeah, so just like the gut, the skin has a bacterial environment, called the skin microbiome contains millions, not millions and billions of microbes, some harmful bacteria, but also a lot of really healthy bacteria. That's great for us. And our research actually uncovered that four out of five eczema cases are linked to an imbalance in the skin microbiome. And Gladskin is the first and only I'm a product that actually focuses on restoring this balance in addition of moisturizing and soothing symptoms, which is really great.

Chrissy:

So what, what does it typically look like? Like the most popular version, I guess?

Brittany Johnson:

Yeah, so it's usually just like a red rash. Depending on skin tone, the color can differ slightly as well. And then it's just extremely achieved for the most part. I feel like that's definitely the best way to describe a topic dermatitis. It can differ a little bit from person to person, but usually like a red itchy rash, that kind of comes and goes is usually atopic dermatitis.

Chrissy:

Okay. And what should parents look out for with their kids skin when it comes to spotting eczema or any other skin problems?

Brittany Johnson:

Yeah, so much specifically, if they noticed that their child has an itchy rash, it's always best to see a doctor to get it properly diagnose. One way you might be able to tell is if your child is scratching a rash if their sleep is constantly interrupted. They'd like this uncontrollable itch with babies because they can't they don't have the motor control over their hands yet, a lot of times they'll rub their body on something. So that's a way to tell with younger babies as well. Like I was mentioning earlier, it tends to go away and then come back. So if they noticed that something is kind of coming and going, that could be eczema. And then it usually starts at a young age. So if it's an older child, and they've never had a skin issue, it's likely not eczema, most likely something else.

Chrissy:

And so at what point would you typically suggest someone should see a doctor about it? Like if you just have, you know, dry skin and you're using, you know, lotions or products, trying to alleviate the symptoms, and it's so not getting better? At what point do you say, Well, this is just dry skin, it will go away, or I think now's the time that I need to see a dermatologist or a doctor about this.

Brittany Johnson:

Yeah, so dry skin doesn't tend to have like that itch that eczema prone skin has. So it's like they're seeing itching, that may be a time to see a doctor. If it's something that is coming back a lot like it's kind of going away, and then coming back and then going away, and then coming back, that could be time to see a doctor. And just like if it's starting to look like a rash, rather than just like dry flaky skin, probably time to see a doctor too.

Chrissy:

Is it uhm is eczema caused byis it hereditary? Or is it a seasonal thing where its environmental, what causes it?

Brittany Johnson:

So the exact cause is still unknown. A lot of times it is genetic. Things like seasonal, like weather and like food allergies and things like that can be triggers, but they aren't actually the cause of it. So science is still kind of digging deeper into that to figure out what exactly is causing eczema.

Chrissy:

Yeah. Okay. I know, I just asked you like a million dollar question. So why is Eczema Awareness Month important? And also, what is it about? I mean, I'm sorry to say that I didn't, I didn't know it was a thing. So you know, that's one of the reasons why I was excited to talk to you. Can you tell us a little bit more about it?

Brittany Johnson:

Yeah. So eczema currently affects about 31 million people. And experience can differ from person to person. It's such a gray area, like I was mentioning, there's still so much research to be done about it. There's a lot of mental and emotional effects that people kind of, I feel like people think about the physical effects, but it also has a lot of these mental and emotional effects on people as well. So yeah, it's just important to kind of raise more awareness about like, what it is the effects of it. And just like pour more into the research that needs to be done. And then at Gladskin. This month, we're going even deeper into education about all parts of eczema and social media and email. So it's definitely worth subscribing to our email list and following us on Instagram. It is Eczema Awareness Month, but because most eczema sufferers are already aware of their condition, we're using Eczema Awareness Month to kind of help them understand it by like debunking myths, exploring origins, and then like talking about advances in treatment as well.

Chrissy:

Okay. And I know you talk about, obviously, the physical side of eczema affecting people, but you just mentioned like the mental aspect, too. So kind of circling back to the kids conversation. Why can eczema be challenging for our children or for any kids?

Brittany Johnson:

Yes, so it's really common in kids. Like I said, it's mostly genetic, but not always, a lot of times, either parent, when not a lot of times, sometimes it's possible that neither parents had it. So they're starting from zero when it comes to understanding it, and treatment and things like that. And with the mental and emotional effects, sometimes it can lead to bullying with kids, which makes it even tougher on them. Many common treatments are actually really aggressive and harsh. So either people are using like a drugstore cream or like something that's really hard, that could affect the child's health, outside of what you're trying to do. So that can be tough on parents, and kids being so young with these really aggressive treatments, and then preparing again, young babies and toddlers can't really verbally express what they're feeling, which makes it tougher. And then also, like I mentioned before, the like lack of motor control and being able to scratch. And then like, in addition to the kids, it does have an effect on the parents. Lack of sleep is something I hear all the time. But triggers are hard to know unless it's something they've come in contact with and had like a negative reaction. And then finding the best treatment that's not going to have any like long term effects, but it's still effective in treating eczema can be tough as well. So for kids, it's definitely it can be very challenging and very tricky for a lot of different reasons.

Chrissy:

So Brittany, in the beginning, I mentioned that you work with a lot of parents. And so can you share with us some of the things that you've seen working with different families and different experiences?

Brittany Johnson:

Yeah, so first and foremost, a lot of parents when they're learning about this, and they're trying to figure out treatments, and they're trying things and things are making it worse or they're not effective. The parents are feeling like they did something wrong, or like this is their fault that their child is going through this and suffering. So we just always want to reassure them, they didn't do anything wrong. There's so much information out there. There's so many products out there. It's tough to know what you should and shouldn't be using. You can't really predict if something is going to work for your little one or if it's not going to work for them. So it's just really important to keep that in mind and it's something that we remind parents of all the time. And then in terms of the kids themselves, a lot of times, it can hold them back from doing things or wanting to do things. For example, if they're having an eczema flare-up a lot of times they can't go in the pool, and they can go swimming with their friends, which can be tough to kind of feel like you're not included or that you can do certain things because of your skin. There was one parent that I was talking to that said her little girl before using Gladskin, didn't want to go to school anymore because of the flare ups. And she was embarrassed, it was breaking her heart. And then she started using Gladskin and the eczema really went down. And she felt confident going to school again, which is something that we just love to hear. There was another mom that I talked to, that would wake there would be four times a night with eczema, flare ups and itch and reapplying lotions and things like that. Her daughter would cry and say, Mommy, why can't I be normal, which I can only imagine it's so tough for a parent. And she said within, I believe it was four days of using Gladskin, it was like mostly gone. And she was just amazed because she had tried everything. We deal with a lot, a lot of people who have tried everything, and they kind of go into it skeptical, like this probably won't work for me, but we'll try it. And then they end up having amazing results. So it's really rewarding to see that it's hard to hear the stories and things that they've gone through previously. But I love that Gladskin can make such a difference in the lives of so many people.

Chrissy:

Yeah. So you had mentioned I know, a couple of kids, or a couple of families that you've worked with, where they haven't been able to go swimming or things like that. Why is that? Is that because the chlorine really affects them. And have you seen any other activities that they haven't been able to participate in because of eczema?

Brittany Johnson:

Yeah, so chlorine, just kind of in then keep the pool clean can also disrupt the skin's microbiome, which can then like, trigger or worsen a flare up that's already happening. So it's definitely something that a lot of kids and parents choose to steer clear of, when they have a child with eczema, or they're just having an eczema flare up at that time. So in addition to swimming, sweat overall can worsen a flare up, that can kind of be a trigger. So that makes it tricky with a lot of activities that will cause a child to sweat. And then with Halloween coming up, things like costumes, a lot of them are made with really itchy kind of irritating material. So kids with eczema may have to kind of stear clear of things like that use like really cotton, really gentle cotton clothing that isn't going to further irritate their skin or make any like itching or redness any worse. Yeah.

Chrissy:

So what do you suggest to, I know, you had you had also mentioned that that little girl that didn't want to go to school because you know, she has eczema. And I feel like, I feel like, you know, in addition to using Gladskin or whatever product works. I as a parent would would want to, you know, help shelter my kid like, I don't know, I mean, we're even if even regardless of kids, like if you're an adult, and you're embarrassed if you put makeup on it, or is that like a big no-no, to put something on it to cover it up to kind of hide it.

Brittany Johnson:

I'm not necessarily but just a lot of products, you we kind of believe in like less is more using like, the minimum bare minimum amount of things. So like, the more things you're putting on it, the more I guess chance you're taking with like something triggering it, or something having preservatives that could then throw off the skin microbiome. So it's not necessarily a bad thing. But it's just important to be mindful of like, what you're using the ingredients in them, things like that, when it comes to trying to cover it up.

Chrissy:

Yeah. Well, and I think that goes back to the importance of you know, the awareness month because even just talking to you now in the 10 minutes, I've been talking to you, you know, people think of eczema, and it's okay, it's it's red and itchy, right? That's what people think. But you don't think about the other aspects of it, like you mentioned with the bullying and you know, just being different, and also the harsh treatments that that these kids or even adults need. So you don't think about that. So that's definitely a great reason to pay attention to the awareness month for sure. So what would you say some of the common triggers are for eczema?

Brittany Johnson:

Yeah, so a lot of people tend to react to really harsh ingredients. So things like detergents, fragrances, drying alcohols, like you mentioned before, like environmental allergens and things like that can also be a trigger and then food allergies. Stress is a really big one changes in weather or just living in a really dry environment, little ones feel.

Chrissy:

Mhm, okay. Well, and so you just mentioned food allergy. So, you know, we recently learned that it can be linked to eczema. So can you tell us more about that and how they're connected?

Brittany Johnson:

Yeah, so there's currently not have substantial scientific evidence like prove a super clear connection between the two. But there's tons of like anecdotal evidence. So that's another aspect that's still being researched. But because everyone's body reacts differently to specific foods, it's almost impossible to provide like a generic eczema diet that's going to help heal everybody. But so what we recommend is an anti inflammatory diet. So just like eating really anti inflammatory foods, and things like that, rather than like elimination, just choosing foods that are going to help and be anti inflammatory.

Chrissy:

Yeah. And is that more on the prevention though, or is that more if you already have eczema, and you want to help eliminate some of the symptoms, to then kind of migrate into an anti inflammatory diet?

Brittany Johnson:

More like a proactive response? Obviously be great if everybody ate an anti inflammatory diet, but because we don't know the cause of it. We don't know if like eating that proactively would help or like make someone not develop eczema.

Chrissy:

Is there anything else that you so that's really interesting, I know, obviously, you know, we at Moms Meet and KIWI, we've talked about the gut microbiome, like you mentioned. But I don't know that I ever really thought about the skin, skin microbiome. So it's really interesting. Is there anything that we can do to strengthen that or to help with that inbounds aside from obviously using products once we have the inbounds? But is there anything we can do proactively to help keep that balance in check?

Brittany Johnson:

So yeah, using products that are free of preservatives, is really helpful, just because preservatives can actually act as antibiotics because they kill the good and bad bacteria that are growing inside of products. So that means it can also kill the good and bad bacteria that's living on your skin. So steering clear of these preservatives as much as possible. It can be tricky. But that definitely helps maintain the balance so that it doesn't get thrown off or destroyed or anything like that.

Chrissy:

Yeah, for sure. Okay. Well, you know, so we're coming up on on fall time and and I I always find my particular season, that's the worst is the winter, it can just be brutal on everyone's skin that you know, they're so dry. And even with a humidifier or hand lotion. I always my hands always get covered in eczema. There's like nothing that I can do. And it's so embarrassing. I get like cracks and blood, like it's like not great. And, you know, so can you share some best practices for taking care of our skin during this time of year that we can do to help alleviate some of those symptoms?

Brittany Johnson:

Yeah, definitely. So it's really great that you're using a humidifier that's like one step ahead of a lot of people. So that's great. Showering with cool or lukewarm water rather than hot water is really helpful with hot water can contribute to the dehydration of the skin. Make sure using fragrance free non irritating washes like our body wash, for example. If you're struggling with really dry hands or feet at night, where you go to bed, you can put on a really thick moisturizer and then put on gloves or socks, which will help lock that moisture in drinking lots of water in the winter, you're probably not creating like a tall glass of ice water. So like getting creative and finding other ways to stay hydrated, whether that's like tea or something else. And then yeah, that's basically all the tips that I would recommend. One great thing about our claim is that you can apply it as often as you'd like. So it's a great idea to like maybe keep it by your desk and make a mental note or even a physical note to apply it like at lunchtime or like every other meeting or something like that, just to kind of be on top of it and make sure you're not waiting until your hands get really dried out before buying anything.

Chrissy:

Yeah, well so I want to talk a little bit more about the moisturizing piece because I know well obviously I think everyone is kind of in this boat now but especially in the wintertime like washing of the hands a lot. I find that all the hand washing dishes and cleaning really irritates it, it really makes my skin more so. And I've been told like well just use moisturizer after you're done those things like so is it true that if you moisturize every time after you wash your hands or do the dishes or whatever, it will help alleviate the dry skin or do we need to do something that you know is use something more strong help.

Brittany Johnson:

Yeah, so first, it's really great that you're moisturizing because that is super important. But either way if you're consistently washing your hands, they're going to kind of get stripped and dried out. So if you're not actively like washing your hands like if you're doing something like washing the dishes, I would recommend wearing gloves just to kind of protect the skin and like not unnecessarily strip them or throw off the balance. But other than that lotion or moisturizer after washing your hands is perfect.

Chrissy:

Well I was kind of laughing when you were mentioning the gloves or the socks at nighttime because I do that every single night. And sometimes my husband will walk and he's like, what? And then like, he just sees like a blob is like what is going on? And honestly, like, it really does help when I when I wake up in the morning, my hands are really soft and and then like, you know, I go through my day and I'm washing my hands too much and it just kind of resets everything, but it does definitely help for sure.

Brittany Johnson:

Yeah, that's awesome. That's hilarious that your husband, but it's so helpful. And I think it's underrated in such an easy thing to do and to like incorporate into your routine.

Chrissy:

Yeah, yeah. And I know kind of on top of talking more about the we talked about the hand washing but obviously now more and more people are using hand sanitizer. I know I do a lot more like anytime I'm leaving the grocery store or whatever. What do you suggest for those that do end up using a lot like, it can certainly aggravate dry, cracked skin, or itchy skin. But we also want to be healthy. So it's hard. It's a hard balance. So what would you recommend for that?

Brittany Johnson:

Yes, so when you have the option, I would always recommend washing your hands with gentle soap. Rather than using hand sanitizer. I know when you're on the go, that's not always an option. But if you do have access to a sink and some soap, always go that route rather than hand sanitizer. Just because hand sanitizer or alcohol based hand sanitizers specifically are almost too effective. Like they're great at killing bacteria, but it can also kill the good bacteria. So it's disrupting that skin microbiome. So if you go for maybe a hand sanitizer that isn't alcohol based, or like I said, just washing your hands with a gentle soap instead, definitely the way to go whenever possible. With the pandemic, it can be a little tricky when you're out and about. So I know sometimes the only option is alcohol based hand sanitizer, but just kind of doing what you can when when you can to prevent hopefully a flare up or making it aggravated.

Chrissy:

Yeah, I'm glad you mentioned that because that was that was gonna be my next question about, like hand sanitizer, altering that microbiome that you mentioned. And yeah, but if it's especially if it has alcohol in it, it's probably going to strip almost all the bacteria but you know, versus only the bad bacteria.

Brittany Johnson:

Exactly, yeah. And we still need that good bacteria to kind of protect us and keep our skin strong and healthy. So we want to minimize that as much as possible.

Chrissy:

Yeah. So we've been talking about, you know, adults and I know we you know, we touched on kids. So we know skincare is important for adults. But is it also just as important for babies and kids as well?

Brittany Johnson:

It is but kind of in a different way. Babies don't need much to keep their skin happy and healthy. Really just like a gentle cleanser and a lotion or moisturizer. I feel like with adults, we try to like do a lot a lot of the time. Because we have other concerns. And babies have such like a perfect plump skin that we just want to maintain that and just like be super gentle and just make sure that they're moisturize and fun.

Chrissy:

Yeah, yeah. Okay. Well, and so what would be some good advice for new parents? What should they know about their baby's skin? So, for instance, how is baby's skin different than adult skin? You know, what ingredients should we look out for? How often do we bathe our baby? I know, I'm expecting a baby in November and I'm already worried about you know, it's gonna be cold and dry. And I don't want to be there too much, but I don't I don't know whether to moisturizer every time. So be helpful to get your feedback on that.

Brittany Johnson:

Yeah, definitely. So baby's skin is actually more permeable than adult skin so things are absorbed into it and into the bloodstream at a higher rate, which means we have to be even more careful with their skin. So it's important to only use the most gentle ingredients. At Gladskin we generally recommend avoiding baby soaps because they can really dry out the skin so instead opting for like a really gentle cleanser. That instead opting for a gentle cleanser that is free of preservatives, fragrances and dyes. We recommend especially for babies with sensitive or like eczema prone skin short lukewarm baths like two to three times a week is honestly enough. Baby skin in addition to being very permeable is also very sensitive to the sun. So keeping the babies in shade as much as possible and covering their skin with clothing and they do have to be in the sun because they can develop rashes due to sun exposure. So it's super important to protect them from that might not be as much of a concern at first for you having a baby in November when it's kind of winter time. But yeah, it's super important to keep in mind for the summer months.

Chrissy:

Yeah, because I don't think you're supposed to put sunscreen on a baby until a certain age I forget.

Brittany Johnson:

Yeah, that's correct.

Chrissy:

Yeah. And so Okay, so you said about two to three times a week for bathing. So you know, so just talking about bathing and some of the products and you said you know, think avoid ones that have like fragrant fragrances and stuff. Do you are there certain ingredients we should be looking for on the label that we should not be giving or using or any specific skincare products that we should just avoid putting on a newborn in general.

Brittany Johnson:

Usually keep it super simple. Like I was mentioning with like a wash and a lotion, preservatives, there's huge long list of what preservatives can be lifted out. So it's important to like look at that and try to find one. Without preservatives, if possible. fragrances, luckily, usually just listed as like fragrance or perfume. So it's like, easy to catch. So that's one you should look out for. And then any dyes like red, blue, things like that, when it says that on the label, you kind of want to stay away from that with the little ones.

Chrissy:

Yeah, I know. It's so hard. I feel like all of the like baby moisturizers and bath bubbles, and they smell so good. But you're like you don't want to put those chemicals on your button on your skin so important to remember.

Brittany Johnson:

Yeah, it's definitely helped with all the marketing with babies out there, too. Especially for the sensitive skin ones that like them most importantly, to be super, super gentle with.

Chrissy:

Yeah. Well, I want to talk more about Gladskin. So what would you say makes Gladskin's products so unique?

Brittany Johnson:

Yeah, so all of them are formulated with the skin's microbiome in mind, which is great. They're formulated in a lab in Europe and meet the strictest purity standards. So everything is like very gentle, we only use the most necessary ingredients, the most pure ingredients. They're free of preservatives, drying alcohols, fragrances and like other harsh ingredients. And we're the only brand that's using endolysin technology in the US can be used as frequently as needed safe for long term use, which is super, super important. For the little ones, we don't want to put them on anything ideally that they can't use long term, or can't use frequently to kind of manage symptoms. It's gentle enough for babies three months in all, which is great. It can be used anywhere externally, including like the eyelids, which is some of the most delicate skin on the body. So it's like very, very gentle. And yeah, it's the first product that actually really works in the majority of people with eczema and doesn't have the trade offs that other options might have.

Chrissy:

Yeah. Can you expand upon that? I can't I probably I'm gonna butcher this. What did you say endo leichten?

Brittany Johnson:

Endolysin technology?

Chrissy:

Yeah, that, that one

Brittany Johnson:

Yeah. So endolysins are naturally found on the skin. And it's basically the technology that we use that is doing the balancing of the skin's microbiome. So being really tough on that bad bacteria, but still allowing the good bacteria to continue to grow and thrive and all of that.

Chrissy:

Got it. Okay, that's really cool. That's really interesting. Now I learned a new word today. So can you use Gladskin products with other skincare products? And can you use them with other eczema creams that use steroids as well?

Brittany Johnson:

Yeah, so you can use them with other you can use Gladskin with other products. With our eczema cream, we recommend applying it first waiting five minutes for it to absorb and kind of do what it needs to do. And then applying anything else after. You can apply, like I mentioned other products, but we want to steer clear of those preservatives because they can disrupt the skin's microbiome. So for best results, we recommend keeping the rest of your routine preservative free, if possible, just so that you get the full effects of what bad skin is doing. And then in terms of steroids, you can absolutely use it with steroids. They work in different ways. So they won't counteract each other, which is really great. But still want to apply that Gladskin first with the five minutes and apply of steroids if necessary.

Chrissy:

Right. So I'm curious to expand upon the steroid cream conversation. So I would love to know what your thoughts are on a steroid cream using that to help eczema. I know I've seen a dermatologist but my hands and they seem to always want to prescribe that, but it never works for me. So what are your thoughts on using steroids for it?

Brittany Johnson:

Yeah, so steroids are super common treatment. They do have side effects, they can be addicted to the skin, they're kind of like a band aid solution. So they're not getting to the root of the issue. It's just kind of like slapping a bandaid to get rid of the reaction that's happening. It is important to be mindful of how often and how long you use them because they can have side effects. do a lot of research before starting them. And then if you are ever on the fence about it, if you're not sure if you should start with them, it's always a good idea to just get a second opinion see what somebody else thinks.

Chrissy:

Yeah well, and I think that's what the big difference between you know, like a steroid cream and Gladskin is. Gladskin, the products are helping to rebuild that skin microbiome as opposed to just kind of treating it like you said with the bandaid and fixing the temporary problem.

Brittany Johnson:

So rebalancing the skin microbiome is just great for overall skin health in general. So it is something that you do have to keep using in order to keep balancing the skin's microbiome, especially when it comes like flare ups and things like that. But yeah, it's a great long term solution because you don't have the side effects that you'll get with other other solutions and other treatments and things like that. Yeah. So who can use Gladskin products. So anyone three months and up can use Gladskin. And even if you don't have eczema, it's a super clean moisturizer and rebounds. The skin's microbiome is great for everybody. We all want to have balanced healthy skin, like I personally use it as a face moisturizer, and I don't have eczema. And I love it. So yeah, honestly, anyone can use Gladskin anyone three months and up.

Chrissy:

Have you seen or do you know, can babies grow out of eczema? Once you know if they have it as a young child? Is that something that they grow out of? Or do they have it for the rest of their lives?

Brittany Johnson:

Yeah, so actually, two thirds of babies will grow out of eczema. So most of them do. A lot of them do tend to have dryer skin as an adult still, but they won't continue to get those eczema flare ups, which is really great. Like, it's great news for parents that a lot of times their baby will grow out of it. And it won't be like a lifelong thing. But there is still that 1/3 of babies that will continue to have it throughout their life. So yeah.

Chrissy:

Yeah. So and then can you expand upon why Gladskin products are so safe for babies and kids to use?

Brittany Johnson:

Yeah, so they're completely free of harsh ingredients. Like I mentioned, that can be used long term. their pediatrician recommended particularly our body wash and our eczema cream. And they're just ultra gentle and perfect for even the softest baby skin. So kind of gives you that middle ground between like a drugstore lotion and like a prescription where you're getting where you have something that is getting to the root of eczema by rebalancing the skin's microbiome, but it's also helping sooth those symptoms.

Chrissy:

Okay, that's interesting. Well, so I mentioned in the beginning of the podcast, in your introduction, that you're a license and I really am going to butcher this - estetician. So can you tell us what an esthetician does?

Brittany Johnson:

Yeah. So estheticians specialize in skincare, some esthetician do waxing as well. And kind of just under skin, understanding overall skin health and how to care for the skin every day. And then if an esthetician works in a spa, or a medical spa or something like that, you're also doing treatments for overall skin health or even just like for aesthetic purposes, facials, micro needling, things like that. So yeah.

Chrissy:

And how did you get connected with Gladskin?

Brittany Johnson:

Um, I've been working in skincare for about two years now. And I really just loved what Gladskins doing the science behind it is super revolutionary. The purpose is just something that I really stand behind inflammatory skin conditions are super close to my heart. Although I don't personally have eczema. I have a lot of people in my life that do. So this new gentle treatment just really was really intriguing to me, and it was something that I wanted to get behind and help out with. So yeah.

Chrissy:

Here's what's new at Moms Meet and KIWI magazine. Don't miss KIWI magazines fall issue, which is out now. We're covering how you can create a more connected family through peaceful parenting and back to school tips, tricks, supplies, and so much more. We've got some amazing sampling opportunities going on at mom's knee.Right now, you can apply to try Happy Buddha Hemp Mint Flavored Full Spectrum Spagyric CBD Tincture, SpoonfulONE Mix-ins, Bartlett Pears, and Brazi Bites Homestyle Breakfast Sandwiches. You know, I feel like I'm prepared to take on my own winter skin this year, as well as knowing what I should be doing to to hear my new baby newborn baby's skin. It's been such a great conversation. Thank you so much for joining us today, Brittany, and for sharing all of your knowledge with us.

Brittany Johnson:

Of course. Thank you so much for having me.

Chrissy:

Yeah, well, thanks for everybody who's listening. Make sure you hit that subscribe button to make sure you don't miss the latest podcast episode. And join us for season two of Raising Healthy Families this fall kicking off on November 3. Thanks for conquering healthy living at all ages and stages of life with us.